Announcements On The First Day Will Define A Lot For Venezuela After Chavez

March 5, 2013

military

It is my interpretation that the first Maduro speech was the result of not having reached a decision as to how to proceed forward once Chavez’ death ocurred. You don’t have a gathering of the Cabinet, twenty Governors, the military high command and the high ranking members of Chavez’ PSUV party, to discuss spelling some US Air Force attache to Venezuela or talk about discipline in this tough moment. We may never know the truth, but I suspect that the meeting at 11 AM was to discuss how to proceed and there was not a unanimous agreement.

While one can be concerned about Diosdado Cabello’s absence, it is also true that his mother died on Sunday and was buried yesterday. However, under the Constitution it should be him that assumes the Presidency until the election is held within the next thirty days, which I think will likely be stretched until April 7th. or 14th.  because clearly, there could be logistic problems and within thirty days involves holding elections on Easter Sunday, when most of Venezuela is likely returning from vacation.

But the two key decisions are precisely that, that Diosdado Cabello assumes the Presidency until the elections and the announcement that, at least, there will be quick elections. In this manner the Constitutional order will be preserved, which still matters.

Any other path, will signify a bad start for the post-Chavez era, which will likely irreversibly mark the future of Venezuela.

While it was offensive for the military high command to use the word comrade and socialism and political slogans, I found two positives in their words: First, they said the Constitution will be enforced by them and then they sent a message of support for Nicolas Maduro and Diosdado Cabello. Given Maduro’s leading role in all this, the second part had to contain a message to all. I do hope that I am not reading too much into this, but  that is my interpretation.

Because in the end, I think all of the secrecy and moves of the last two months have been motivated by the desire to have Chavez be sworn in so that Maduro could be President and candidate at the same time. Things did not work out Maduro’s way, let us then hope the Constitution is followed and the post-Chavez era begins on the right foot for Venezuela.

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95 Responses to “Announcements On The First Day Will Define A Lot For Venezuela After Chavez”

  1. Gerry Says:

    I think the MUD should immediately request the TSJ to postpone the new elections for three months due to special circumstances.
    God given hair should hold the government for a few months so everyone knows the total mismanagement.

  2. m_astera Says:

    Paper ballots, hand marked and hand counted. Takes at most a few hours for the poll workers.
    Then secured in a safe.
    Nothing else can be trusted.
    Nothing else.

  3. Paul Says:

    Chinchila….pleaaaaase! “mocking democracy? You sound like someone who has never lived in a true democracy. Sure, relected time and time again. And THEN, slowly but surely begin to “modify” the constitution to meet the autocrats needs for more and more power ala Correa, Morales, etc.

  4. Chinchilla Says:

    The voices that cheer and mock the death of Hugo Chavez are in fact mocking democracy and the people of Venezuela, who elected him and who have re-elected him time and time again — most recently by a decisive majority in October, 2012.

    • firepigette Says:

      On the contrary Chinchilla, we honor the possibility of a future for Venezuela.

      There is no place in the name of sanity for the kind of hate rhetoric that came out of Chavez’s mouth, and what is still coming out of his followers.

    • Roger Says:

      To be correct, we are talking about the death of a Former Venezuelan President who for some reason could not even be sworn in using Yamomani sign language or something that would have looked good as a PhotoShop photo op.

  5. Carolina Says:

    So, Maduro como que se autojuramento. MCM is all over the subject in twitter.

  6. arco Says:

    The usa sprankled some japanese seawater on his alo-presidente-chair. Thats how his testikel cancer started!

  7. firepigette Says:

    • Ronaldo Says:

      I found it. I found how Chavez got cancer.
      It was RED dye #2, a known carcinogen banned in food but still used in clothing.
      Chavez always, always wore red clothing and it finally killed him.

  8. moctavio Says:

    Mourning decree in Official Gazette was signed by Nicolas Maduro as President in charge. (President Encargado)

  9. someone Says:

    The question is: Who is more corrupt?
    The opposition or chavismo?
    If the nasty comments on the dead of the most important Venezuelan person in current times give any clue about the decency of the opposition, I fear for worse to come. Reestablishing of the banana republic. At least he had pride.

  10. Carolina Says:

    My husband keeps asking me “Is he still dead?” with a very sarcastic tone…LOL.

    • firepigette Says:

      Once when I was half asleep, I thought they would rise him from the dead.That’s just how crazy things are that thoughts like that can even occur 😉

  11. cecilio Says:

    they’ve lied all this time and still we’ll let them run in a new election? I can’t believe there will ever be a clean election as long as CUBA’s influence is alive

  12. Carolina Says:

    Nice to see your face diablo. 🙂

  13. niaquinialla Says:

    Gracias por otro buen artículo.

    …y la frase del día:

    MISIÓN CUMPLIDA: Patria, Socialismo o Muerte –, firmado: Hugo Chávez

  14. moctavio Says:

    His Mausoleo is ready, I put a picture up Oct. 7th.

    • firepigette Says:

      Holy Smokes, a modern day Pharaoh’s tomb

    • syd Says:

      I figured this was built for him, and not really for Bolívar. Or, for both. But the drive to commission the design and the building of this monument was all Hugo’s.

    • LD Says:

      Yes, that, only we thought it was an extension of the National Pantheon, and probably will be an entity of his own… para los Dos Libertadores… (I know I’m not the first saying it is for Hugo, but according to the, you know, pesky law it couldn’t be for Hugo until 25 years…)

    • expat Says:

      feels more like a concrete highway barrier design,
      or maybe a steep skateboard ramp …
      painting it red might help…

    • Carolina Says:

      I just read this on a friend’s wall on fb:

      “Artículo 187. Corresponde a la Asamblea Nacional: Acordar los honores del Panteón Nacional a venezolanos y venezolanas ilustres, que hayan prestado servicios eminentes a la República, después de transcurridos veinticinco (25) años de su fallecimiento. Esta decisión podrá tomarse por recomendación del Presidente o Presidenta de la República, de las dos terceras partes de los Gobernadores o Gobernadoras de Estado o de los rectores o rectoras de las Universidades Nacionales en pleno.”

      Who has a constitution handy?

      • moctavio Says:

        part 15 Art. 187 of Constitution: 15. Acordar los honores del Panteón Nacional a venezolanos y venezolanas ilustres, que hayan prestado servicios eminentes a la República, después de transcurridos veinticinco años de su fallecimiento. Esta decisión podrá tomarse por recomendación del Presidente o Presidenta de la República, de las dos terceras partes de los Gobernadores o Gobernadoras de Estado o de los rectores o rectoras de las Universidades Nacionales en pleno.

    • m_astera Says:

      Man, that is some ugly architecture, and I say that as a long time designer and builder. Poorly built too. Total crap. Fitting for Chavez.

    • Ira Says:

      That is the ugliest effin’ thing I’ve ever seen.

      Perhaps the opposition can later turn it into a skateboard ramp, which is what it looks like!

      “100 Bolivares to ride over the dead asshole’s corpse!”

      Sorry Miguel–but I have a hard time summoning up any respect or reverence for this guy, because not EVERY corpse deserves respect, you know?

  15. LD Says:

    Maybe irrelevant, but as he could not go to the National Pantheon before 25 years, they maybe call the new pantheon as another entity and he could go directly there… Monumento Bolivariano or the like…

  16. deananash Says:

    Easter Sunday is PERFECT – a “resurrection” of sorts. Don’t imagine that this – the timing of the announcement of Chavez’s death – wasn’t a strategic decision. How many Rojorojito travel for Semana Santa? And how many of the opposition?

    And as I mentioned, the symbolism is awesome – from a Chavismo perspective.

    • deananash Says:

      Miguel, what do you think of my analysis?

      • moctavio Says:

        I think it is too risky to have them on that day, you need witnesses, organization in a week that everyone takes off, to go to your home town or whatever. Risky, because the total number of voters could make you look bad, even if you win. So, I think the earliest will be April 7th.

  17. Ira Says:

    Miguel Tweeted a link for a FANTASTIC article by Rory Carroll on Hugo’s “legacy” that appeared in the NY Times.

    I think it appropriate that he supplies the link here.

    It was the best summation of this scumbag’s life that I ever read.

  18. island canuck Says:

    So now it starts.

    El Video de “Evita” Golinger : Hay evidencias que EEUU habría inducido el cáncer”

    http://www.reporteconfidencial.info/noticia/3188457/el-video-de-evita-golinger-hay-evidencias-que-eeuu-habria-inducido-el-cancer/

    We are going to here this absurd comment many times in the coming weeks. The new fantasy of the extreme left.

  19. bobthebuilder Says:

    I read the military statement as just covering all bases while the politicos get themselves arranged.

    But the Cabello angle is intriguing. By the constitution, this guy should now be president. Yet he hasn’t said a word. I take your point about the death of his mother, but even so the total silence is strange for a guy with so much power.

    Where does this leave the opposition? If I were Capriles I would be very wary about wasting my political capital on another presidential election fail. On the other hand, who else could reasonably have a chance? In the end it probably doesn’t matter anyway. By hook or crook (& probably crook) the Chavistas will be in power for the foreseeable future.

    Which leads me to Maduro. He ain’t no Chavez but will surely surf the endless cycle of Chavez remembrance to an election victory. Post-election he has economic challenges, but the biggest challenge to Venezuelan prosperity (Chavez) has just gone. However, I suppose the biggest problem for this ‘yes’ man will be keeping the Chavistas together – stand by for a big authoritarian lurch to the left & a messy election campaign.


  20. For me, the military saying that they will uphold the Constitution is really not a guarantee of anything, after all, everyone is supossed to do so, civilians and military alike, and we all know chavismo follows, interprests, twists, or ignores the Constitution and the laws based on what’s more convenient for them.

    Now, on Maduro being the candidate, I don’t really think so. Had they accepted the “falta absoluta”, Cabello would have been sworn in as temporal president, and Maduro could had been the candidate, but the court came up with the administrative continuity, and Maduro nept the position of VP, and the constitution states that VPs can’t be candidates for the presidency; so, for me, all the pieces were set for Cabello to be the candiate, not Maduro.

    • LD Says:

      Didn’t Diosdado said he was with Chávez ss he passed away, asking for instructions? (I came late to his speak). Maybe it is last minute change…

    • Alberto Says:

      “the constitution states that VPs can’t be candidates for the presidency”

      Why are people still referring to the constitution as if anyone in the government has ever paid it any attention? They do what they want, when they want it, and they don’t give a crap if you don’t like it. You would think that after a while people would have gotten the message.

  21. Kepler Says:

    They are violating the constitution already. When are there elections?
    Why isn’t Diosdado now interim president?

  22. Paal Says:

    Diosdado’s speech was very interesting. Very patriotic and non-socialist, he very seldom wears red nowadays. I guess some parts of the chavista military are fed up with the communists loonies (Giordani, Maduro, Arreaza etc) are messing up the country with their student extreme leftism.

  23. Roger Says:

    Right now I just want to see the body laying in state and buried in Catholic Holy Ground (next to bolivar is fine) so he stays dead forever. They should put a webcam on him so we can make sure he is still there.

  24. jau Says:

    Congrats Venezuela, you are a lucky country. If you dont believe that, ask any cuban that have had FIDEL for 50+ years. We got off easy…

    Now, whats going to happen next? no idea, but tonight I am having one too many drinks. Tomorrow I’ll worry about tomorrow.

  25. Gordo Says:

    Will the demand for the “truth” regarding Chavez’s health stop now? Will the truth be blacked out forever more?

  26. Larry Says:

    Folks, nothing gonna happen like you think, wish or want it to. How many time have we been here before

    • Lawrence Says:

      GWEH alert!!!

    • Ira Says:

      If you recall, it was the people here who with no uncertainty predicted Hugo’s death–against the lies and denials of the Chavista trolls who visit here, and Chavistas everywhere.

      In fact, Chavez’s illness and death illustrates the main core of Chavismo:

      Lies and denial.

  27. Larry Says:

    PDVSA Falcon 900 YV2040 is a third of the way to Havana from Ccs. Nothing to report just the aircraft movement,

  28. PaulaH Says:

    Jaua annouced Maduro as the interim President and frutare candidate… Howard about that for following the laws… :-/

  29. Roger Says:

    Beware the Ides of March! Followed by the Marc Anthony speech made famous by the Bard. “…..I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him…..” Of course we all know how the play ends.
    One thing I very much enjoyed in Venezuela was that some of the people I worked with would often quote writers from Cervantes to Lorca. If they have not said the same thing, Im sure this will be food for thought for future writers.

    • Luisa Says:

      oh yes, the ides of March… thank you for this reminder.. how history rewrites itself is the constant…

  30. m_astera Says:

    All will be well. We get a new chance. They failed with their fake Castro.
    I love Venezuela. What Chavez gave us is the knowledge and concern that the poor were being neglected. His cronies turned out to be just as much scumbags as the ones he objected to. Honrado, o no honrado? They had every chance and failed on all cases, but we get the idea. The wealth of Venezuela belongs to all the people, not to scumbag politicians. So say I.

    Honrado

  31. Susan Says:

    I agree with m_astera . The citizens need federal debit cards and oil profits need to be shared. We wish all the legal best for the Venesuelan people.

  32. Alex (the other) Says:

    Anything is possible. If they want to ignore the Constitution, they will find an excuse to do so. If they want elections because they find that´s the strategic way to go, then elections it is.
    It’s all up to them. Chavismo is a cohesive group of people all aligned in the objective of remaining in control indefinitely. They control the country, the oil wealth and unfortunately there’s little common citizens can do nor are willing to do in order to prevent it.

  33. m_astera Says:

    Let’s do some simple arithmetic. 2 million barrels of oil per day, at $100 per barrel is $200 million, yes? Per day? That belongs to the people of Venezuela. Not to criminal politicos who have taken over the government. And they have stolen most of that. While forcing hard working farmers to sell for below their cost, and stealing properties at will. To prison with all of them, and let their families suffer as they have made others suffer. They deserve no more mercy than they have shown, which is none.

  34. LD Says:

    Jaua said Maduro will continue as president until the elections… ?!?!
    He didn’t spoke to Chávez for at least the 2 weeks too… ?!?!

  35. Lou Says:

    The chapel and the Panamanian ambassador is what did it for me. It was a crescendo

  36. Roberto N Says:

    i am no Constitutional Scholar but I think Maduro will be named MFIC.

    The January 9 ruling “extended” the Chaverment, therefore the fact Chavez never took the oath is moot (in TSJ WORLD, that is) so he was not President Elect, and that means Maduro and not Diosdado.

    If you believe that Chavez was President Elect, not President, then it is correct to aver that Disodado is in charge.

    However, that will be hard to justify sinc it would mean the TSJ would be reveersing itself barely 2 months from their ruling.

    Game Set and Match to Maduro.

  37. Lou Says:

    They returned body from Havana last night, He died in January.

  38. moctavio Says:

    Jajaja did not even notice, I meant solid, I think Chavismo will be in powerfor a while yet, but yes, Diosado is the right 😀

  39. expat Says:

    You probably meant ‘on a solid footing for …’
    (the r-word is a no-no)
    [Re >> …post-Chavez era begins on the right foot for Venezuela.]

  40. LuisF Says:

    My reading was not positive. The closing slogans and the raised fists continue to message me a total indoctrination of our ultimate forces, to the castrista plot.

    Donde estan los militares institucionales (sic)?

    I can only hope fro the best, my thoughts and prayers are with Venezuela on this sad day.

    LuisF

  41. m_astera Says:

    I took a walk around the neighborhood, over to the little store, picking up the vibe and talking to some people. The gate guard told me “el commandante esta muerte” the commander is dead. And touched the corner of his eye where tears come from. The feeling is very sad. I don’t and never have liked Chavez, though I have admired him for his guts. The feeling I get is that the whole country is in mourning, and I can feel it, something I’ve never felt here before.

    • firepigette Says:

      M Astera,

      Most of my Venezuela friends and family on facebook are elated.

    • Trin Says:

      Some are mourning and others are setting off firecrackers in joy. But the whole country is not mourning. The only emotions I sense out of people on both sides here in my area of Guarico are apprehension and uncertainty. Not necessarily fear just dread of what’s ahead.

    • m_astera Says:

      All will be well. We get a new chance. They failed with their fake Castro.
      I love Venezuela. What Chavez gave us is the knowledge and concern that the poor were being neglected. His cronies turned out to be just as much scumbags as the ones he objected to. Honrado, o no honrado? They had none, but we get the idea. The wealth of Venezuela belongs to all the people, not to scumbag politicians. So say I.


  42. Reblogged this on danmillerinpanama and commented:
    What to expect during the next few days.

  43. cotatuu Says:

    I totally disagree that it is a good sign that they “… said the Constitution will be enforced by them and then they sent a message of support for Nicolas Maduro and Diosdado Cabello. Given Maduro’s leading role in all this, the second part had to contain a message to all.”

    They will be solidly united until any other political movement is eliminated then, and only then, will they turn their knives to each other…

  44. NET Says:

    Good post. I believe the Chavez death announcement was forced, “post-facto” finally, in part by the students’ actions, but more importantly by Military/Cabello pressure to finally tell the truth, and not try to ex-out Cabello.


  45. 05+03+2013=2021. hoy es 2021

    Enviado desde mi iPhone

    El 05/03/2013, a las 07:40 p.m., The Devil’s Excrement escribió:

    > >


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