A Day In The Life Of The Venezuelan Opposition Candidate

September 12, 2012

Most days, the Capriles campaign tries not to pre-announce where they are going, in order to avoid Chavista thugs from trying to boycott the opposition campaign. This can not be done when he is going to a large city, where preparations are more complex, particularly in terms of security. A couple of weeks ago, Chavistas closed the Ciudad Bolivar airport to stop him from holding a rally that took place anyway. Today, it was Puerto Cabello´s turn.

From the early hours of the morning Chavista bands were blocking the roads and the airport, some arriving in Government owned vehicles. This is a picture of the main road to Puerto Cabello from the airport:

Is not a great picture, but you can see the red shirts blocking the road. this was not accidental, one of the Chavista organizers had tweeted it early in the morning:

“Today at 7 AM, in front of the Bartolome Salom airport the working people of Puerto Cabello say “no” to the fascist who sucks up to the Empire” said @denniscandanga, shown on the right pane as he participated in the violent actions of the day today.

And here is the picture of the airport:

where you can see how violent they got, and there is more in the following picture, where you see some action by the pro-Chavez thugs in the highway leading to the airport:

Of course, it was the property of the Capriles campaign that was damaged. This is what was left of the sound truck:

This is the truck that suffered less damage, the other one was not so lucky:

shown burning in the above picture and then later after it had been incinerated:

But it did not matter, candidate Capriles pressed on, arriving in Puerto Cabello by boat:

And holding the planned rally, which I am sure was much larger than expected as news of the aggression spread around Puerto Cabello (Although a third day of blackouts I am sure helped):

Of course, as Daniel reports, after the events, Government media said the injured were Chavistas and the aggressors were the opposition in the upside down world of Chavismo.

But Capriles did not let himself be intimidated, he pressed on and had a very successful day.

Just a day in the life of the opposition candidate in Venezuela.

(Who is the fascist here?)

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27 Responses to “A Day In The Life Of The Venezuelan Opposition Candidate”


  1. I recommend you read my blog, nesgram.blogspot.com where you will find info on venezuela oil and gas industry and matters of public interest, regards,
    nestor g ramirez
    director member of the board of directors of pdvsa 92-94

  2. Juancho Says:

    There is something very important to point out in the last picture. A big sign of Hope. Do you see how many people gathered there? well you can be totally sure that they are locals because chavists blocked the transit to pto cabello. Unlike Chavez meetings where dozens of buses full of people come from caracas because they have already been paid for assisting and make look like chavez has support of locals.

  3. ErneX Says:

    Capriles just kicked out Juan Carlos Caldera out of his campaign due to this video released by PSUV today:

  4. CharlesC Says:

    This photo is the first one posted by MSN-makes the opposition
    look bad. Note both hands have rocks-big ones and the facial expression.

    http://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/09/12/13834555-supporters-throw-stones-in-venezuela-pre-election-clash#comments

  5. David Cheever Says:

    What is the word I am looking to describe the “Chavistas” ? Oh yeah: “Salvajes!”

  6. megaescualidus Says:

    I say the same as Virginia. However, I fear for Capriles, as everything indicates that as we get closer to the election things things will definitely get dicier.

    This time around Capriles outsmarted the Chavistas, and was able to get to his rally. As it is clear to me it is a coordinated effort from the Chavista side to prevent Capriles from campaigning, next time around they may step up the violence levels.

  7. Ronaldo Says:

    Capriles is a brave and wise man by continuing his rally. Todays action show that Capriles can handle difficult situations.

    Chavez is the coward. He would have called it quits, gone into hiding, but run his mouth ad infinitum.

    Chavistas are trying send a message that listening to Capriles is forbidden. Of course, this attracts even more Venezeulans to see and hear Capriles. Che is hated in Venezuela and having that guy disquised as Che on a moto is really a help for Capriles.


  8. BRAVO CAPRILES!! SIGUE ADELANTE!!!

  9. Dr. Faustus Says:

    “Miguel – Gotta love the last picture of the crowd. That speaks for itself.”

    Indeed it does…..

  10. CharlesC Says:

    If Chavez does not speak out against violence and vandalism by chavistas
    this scene will repeat itself.
    Chavez actually does not feel any responsibility, I believe?
    How many thugs were brought in by bus?

    • island canuck Says:

      They were all brought in by bus. Twitter had some photos of a line of red buses from the mayor’s office. You can see some of them in the photo behind the blue truck that was destroyed.

      Miguel – Gotta love the last picture of the crowd. That speaks for itself.

    • Gringo Says:

      Chavez actually does not feel any responsibility, I believe?

      Most likely Thugo feels responsible, as he most likely ordered the thuggery. It is certainly done with his consent.

    • syd Says:

      If Chavez does not speak out against violence and vandalism by chavistas this scene will repeat itself.

      Where have you been all these years??

      Chávez’ strategy, from around 2000 on, has been to incite, by coded language in his Aló Presidentes, hatred for and threats to non-chavistas, as well as signals to “motorizados” and other disafected who carry a chip on their shoulders, that they should terrorize,

      Chávez did so recently by threatening civil war, in the event of a Capriles win, then retracting that statement, but pointing out that there would be troubles ahead.

      Chávez is not interested, nor has he ever been interested in speaking out against violence and vandalism. He encourages these actions, instead.

      • CharlesC Says:

        I agree 100% but I would hope that as a Presidential candidate
        he would display some semblence of fairness and democratic principles
        at least occasionally…I personally think this site of vehicles burning and injured people is embarassing enough for me to respond -I have heard
        Chavez say”that would be terrible, we don’t want that” (and like you said-I’ve heard the other side too- him inciting revenge for example)well
        this is a moment for Chavez to prove himself. And, by not responding and
        Aissami not responding either speaks volumes.

      • Ira Says:

        How did he retract that incendiary and violent comment?

        That news got by me.

  11. Ken Says:

    Majority rule and the rule of law , are not one and the same.


  12. Try to find the tweet of bolaños: it has been erased!

  13. sincero Says:

    RULE OF LAW, NOT OF MEN OR WOMEN. STARTED IN ENGLAND WITH MAGNA CARTA LIBERTATUM IN 1215, LIMITING THE POWER OF KING JOHN I. WITH REGARD TO CIVIL LIBERTIES FOR THE NOBLES (TAX PAYERS AND SOLDIERS) TOOK 500 HUNDRED YEARS TO DEVELOP INTO SOMETHING REALLY MEANINGFUL IN ENGLAND. NEVER IN LATIN AMERICA, EXCEPT MAYBE CHILE, FOR SOME FLUKE. THE SIMILAR INITIATIVES IN SPAIN DID NOT PROSPER AND SPANISH KINGS RULED AS THEY WISHED TILL OUR REPUBLICS INHERITED THE DIVINE RIGHT OF KINGS TO THIS DAY IN MOST, OR MAJORITY RULE (MOB RULE) WHEN IT IS CONVENIENT. NEVER RULE OF LAW, AS ONE OF OUR LONG LASTING PRESIDENTS SAID “LA CONSTITUCION SIRVE PARA TODO” AND IT IS TRUE, WE ARE THE LA COUNTRIES WITH MOST CONSTITUTIONS, I BELIEVE WE ARE NEAR 40 NOW.

    • deananash Says:

      I’d not argue against Democracy in favor of a “elite” cabal, however, it is worth noting that Chile was not a ‘fluke’. Chile was the beneficiary of a “benevolent” dictator. (Of course, to the untold thousands of unjustly murdered, the use of benevolent is obscene.)

      In the end, it is freedom FROM government (men lording over men) that provides the best form of government. And by “from”, I mean as little government as is absolutely necessary.

      In Venezuela, this would mean that the country’s oil assets would be owned by the people (via shares), but would be a private company.

      And whenever technology would allow us to TAKE [power] AWAY from the government and put it into private hands, we should do it.

  14. Ken Says:

    Astra That is a rediculous statement. Which would you prefer? Minority rule, a dictatorship, or principality with a King?

    • m_astera Says:

      Ken- I would prefer any on your list, if those in positions of power and responsibility had the best interests of all at heart.

      Using media and largesse to manipulate a mob into choosing what they think will get them more something for nothing is not government, it’s simply a trick to claim that the people wanted what they ended up with.

      Or how about Aristotle on Democracy?

      “Democracy arises out of the notion that those who are equal in any respect are equal in all respects; because men are equally free, they claim to be absolutely equal.”

      Sounds like Bolivarian socialism, don’t you think? Anyone can do anything; only elitism and prejudice prevents everyone being completely equal in everything. Including the intelligence to decide who would make the best leaders and administrators.

      But as I said, it’s only a trick to legitimize the fraud. Chavez was duly elected by a majority, hence democracy works. Or something.

  15. m_astera Says:

    Majority rule is a very crude form of government, but in favor these days because the mob is easily manipulated by media and their own self interest.


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